Senator Murphy of Connecticut on guns, democracy and 2024

Last month, Congress passed its first federal gun safety measures in nearly 30 years, a significant step forward on a problem that had long seemed unsolvable. One of the key players behind the legislation was Democratic Senator Chris Murphy, who has pushed for action on guns since the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, a decade ago.

I met Senator Murphy on a gloomy day in northwest Connecticut. He was in the middle of his “Walk Across Connecticut,” an annual event where he literally crosses the state, chatting with voters along the way.

Why we wrote this

Democratic Sen. Chris Murphy of Connecticut was instrumental in securing cooperation in the driveway on federal gun safety legislation. He explains why it worked and where he hopes to find bipartisan agreement next. Part 2 of 2.

After holding a town hall in Litchfield, he wanted to drive a few more miles before calling it a day. He invited me to join him. As we walked, unaccompanied by any staff, the senator spoke freely about guns, Congress, his future and that of America.

Regarding his next legislative axis, he mentioned “an effort to reform the [Count] Acting to try to prevent another January 6,” noting that “if we could reform the underlying law that governs the transition of power in a bipartisan way, it might lead people to have a little more faith… [in] the future of American democracy.

Litchfield, Conn.

Last month, Congress passed its first federal gun safety measures in nearly 30 years, a significant step forward on a problem that had long seemed unsolvable. One of the key players behind the legislation was Democratic Senator Chris Murphy, who has been pushing for action against guns since the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut – a decade before the May shooting. at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas.

I met Senator Murphy on a gloomy day in northwest Connecticut. He was in the middle of his “Walk Across Connecticut,” an annual event where he literally crosses the state, chatting with voters along the way.

Senator Murphy had kayaked in the state on July 4 via the Housatonic River on the Massachusetts border and planned to complete his trek in New Haven four days later. After holding a town hall in Litchfield, he wanted to drive a few more miles before calling it a day. He invited me to join him as he drove down quiet roads next to ponds and public hiking trails. As we walked, unaccompanied by any staff, the senator spoke freely about guns, Congress, his future and that of America.

Why we wrote this

Democratic Sen. Chris Murphy of Connecticut was instrumental in securing cooperation in the driveway on federal gun safety legislation. He explains why it worked and where he hopes to find bipartisan agreement next. Part 2 of 2.

The following are excerpts from our conversation, slightly edited for clarity.

Why do you think Congress was finally able to pass gun safety legislation, after so many failed attempts? Was it just the horrific nature of the shooting at Uvalde Elementary School?

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