ACIC can secretly grill WAGS bikers to reveal their partners’ criminal activities

The Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission has interviewed associates of bikers and may do the same with their WAGs in a bid to unearth information about their partners’ criminal activities.

The criminal organization revealed that it secretly interviewed people linked to outlaw motorcycle gangs, with business associates, family members and accountants in the line of fire.

If those questioned don’t cooperate, they could be jailed until they do, in a blunt response ACIC boss Mike Phelan said he made no apologies.

ACIC can secretly grill WAGS bikers to reveal their partners

Silent coercive interviews were key to uncovering details about biker gangs and their organizational weaknesses

Some suspects with ties to biker gangs have spent months or years in jail for their silence

Some suspects with ties to biker gangs have spent months or years in jail for their silence

Some suspects with ties to biker gangs have spent months or years in jail for their silence

“There is nothing quite like putting pressure on an individual by interrogating, legitimately interrogating, their family and other people around them, who may be living off illicit profits from criminal activity,” said CIAC’s general manager at News Corp.

Some provocative suspects with high profile and underworld connections have spent months or years in jail for their silence.

A South Australian biker who pushed back against ACIC investigations was charged with contempt of court and jailed indefinitely, or until he answers questions, in 2018.

Another person was jailed last year after refusing to cooperate while being investigated for crimes linked to the production of methylamphetamine in the NSW region.

ACIC also intercepted 28 million text messages on a criminal messaging app, ANOM, which contained details of murder plots and large drug deals, leading to nearly 1,000 arrests.

Coercive secret interviews were paramount in uncovering details about motorcycle gangs and their organizational weaknesses.

“If we want to know, for example, what someone’s finances are, or if we want to know how their business structures work, the most appropriate people to call on are sometimes their family, close friends and business associates. ; some of these people are not involved in any criminal activity,” Mr. Phelan said.

Australians spend a record $10 billion a year on illicit drugs, with ACIC saying a cartel involving biker gangs is responsible for smuggling up to $1.5 billion worth of drugs across Australian borders every year.

The news comes as the country’s bike wars escalate, with Comanchero boss Tarek Zahed and his brother Omar attacked in Sydney last week.

Tarek Zahed is now miraculously in stable condition in hospital after being showered with bullets during a training session with his younger brother Omar – also a notorious gang figure – who died at the scene.

The ACIC says a cartel involving biker gangs is responsible for smuggling up to $1.5 billion in drugs across Australian borders every year

The ACIC says a cartel involving biker gangs is responsible for smuggling up to $1.5 billion in drugs across Australian borders every year

The ACIC says a cartel involving biker gangs is responsible for smuggling up to $1.5 billion in drugs across Australian borders every year

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