2,200 films to be restored for ₹363 crore, says I&B minister Anurag Thakur

Films to be restored by NFAI were pre-selected by language committees made up of filmmakers, film historians, producers such as Aparna Sen, Shriram Raghavan, Anjali Menon and Vetrimaaran.

Films to be restored by NFAI were pre-selected by language committees made up of filmmakers, film historians, producers such as Aparna Sen, Shriram Raghavan, Anjali Menon and Vetrimaaran.

India has embarked on the world’s largest film restoration project under which 2,200 films in various languages ​​will be restored at a cost of Rs 363 crore, I&B Minister Anurag Thakur said on Thursday.

The now-award winning restoration project is expected to start in full swing at the National Film Archive of India (NFAI), Thakur said after reviewing the workings of the organization during a visit to Pune.

The films to be restored were shortlisted by linguistic committees made up of filmmakers, film historians, producers such as Aparna Sen, Shriram Raghavan, Anjali Menon and Vetrimaaran, according to an official statement.

“The national film heritage mission, in addition to restoration, also involves the ongoing preservation processes of film condition assessment, preventive conservation and digitization, with a total allocated budget of Rs 597 crore, which is one of the greatest film preservation missions in the world,” the minister said.

In the meantime, the NFAI has undertaken the restoration of 10 prestigious films by Satyajit Ray which will be screened at various international film festivals.

The remastered version of Ray’s classic “Pratidwandi” has been selected by Cannes to premiere in the Cannes Classics section later this month.

The restored version of G Aravindan’s 1978 Malayalam film Thamp will be presented at the world premieres of the restoration in Cannes by the Film Heritage foundation.

Besides Satyajit Ray’s films, feature films as diverse as “Neelakuyil” (Malayalam) and “Do Aakhein Barah Haath” (Hindi) will also be restored.

The restoration process involves digital, semi-automated manual frame-by-frame restoration of image and sound from the best surviving source material.

The source negative/print will be scanned into 4K to .dpx files, which will then be digitally restored.

Damage including scratches, dirt and abrasions in each negative image will be cleaned during the restoration process.

The sound is also restored in a process similar to the image restoration procedure and involves the digital removal of numerous pops, hisses, crackles and distortions from the sound negative.

After restoration, the digital image files will be colored (DI process) and balanced to achieve the look of the film at the time of original release.

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